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. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
is plummeting. in the u.s., stocks were higher on friday. the bloomberg maryland index rising on gains for under armour. i'm jane king reporting for wbal-tv 11 news. >> 39 degrees on tv hill. >> raven safety is packing quite a punch in the ring. keith mills has highlights. that is coming up in sports. >> don't forget to e-mail us your response to our water cooler question of the day. would you change your bank if it suddenly imposed a ceiling on your debit card purchases? you can share your response at wbaltv.com and on our facebook page, or send us an e-mail to watercooler@wbaltv.com. >> here is a look at last night's winning maryland lottery numbers. >> so, ah, your seat good? got the mirrors all adjusted? you can see everything ok? just stay off the freeways, all right? i don't want you going out on those yet. and leave your phone in your purse, i don't want you texting. >> daddy... ok! ok, here you go. be careful. >> thanks dad. >> and call me--but not while you're driving. we knew this day was coming. that's why we bought a subaru. so it's a good thing our new air wick odor detect senses th
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
there are no shortages, just worries. the white house says it's considering of tapping into the 727 million barrels of u.s. strategic oil reserves. >> it's something done on rare occasions. >> the strategic oil reserve is there for emergencies. this is not an emergency. >> reporter: one oil analyst says there's political pressure. for the president to lower prices. >> he can say, i can do something, and you are better off. what elected official would not want to do that. >> reporter: in the meantime, the squeeze is on. >> it's hard to ask our customers for increases right now. so we really have to suck it up and that really hurts. >> reporter: leaving drivers and gas tanks with an increasingly empty feeling. some analysts say when gas gets above $4 a gallon demands prices drop. but in many parts of the country, $4 a gallon gas is now a reality. rob and peggy. >> emily, thanks a lot. >>> that unrest in the middle east shows no signs of slowing. in libya, rebel forces say they're going to regroup and bring in heavy weapons. this after a punishing weekend of air strikes by forces loyal to leader moammar gadh
ground attacks. president obama will speak to the nation tonight to explain what role the u.s. will play in the mission in libya now that nato stepped in. the president is also expected to address concerns by both parties who say he should have consulted with congress before a military intervention. nbc's tracie potts joins us now from washington with details. good morning to you. >> reporter: veronica, good morning. good morning, everyone. the president's got a lot of questions to answer when he addresses the nation tonight. lawmakers here want to know should we even be involved in libya or should we be doing more to take down libya's leader? >> the president's going to address the nation monday night. a lot of these questions will be answered. >> reporter: questions like whether we'll handguns to rebels. >> no decision has been made about that. >> reporter: and how much the u.s. will be involved after nato takes over. >> within the next week or so, we will begin to diminish the commitment of resources. >> reporter: tonight, president obama's supposed to lay out the plan. he said gadhaf
money on its latest device. the handheld 3ds is on sale in the u.s. for $250, 3d games can be played without special glasses. it takes 3d photos and the 3ds will play 3d movies streamed from net fix this summer. nintendo is hoping to nudge the market in a new direction five years after the wii. >>> not having the glasses is a great point. >> absolutely. >> what do you have in the next half hour? >> a company that we all associate with gourmet gift baskets may be declaring bankruptcy as soon as today. >>> no kidding, wow. >>> 9news now is giving you the chance to win an ipad two. >> go to our facebook page, hit the like button and enter our great tablet give away, refer friends and that gives you a better chance of winning one for yourself. if you are already a fan, click the sweep stakes link on the left side of the page. we'll announce the winner this friday april 1st. >>> our time right now nine after the hour, a look at this morning's top stories is next. >> including details of the president's address tonight to americans about the crisis in libya. how soon u.s. forces will hand
that they comply with the u.s. -- with the security council mandate. >> so are you just watching them as proof -- are you watching them? >> we are conducting a wide range of operations across libya. i will not talk about the specifics. certainly the 32nd brigade is always considered in the calculation on how we expand the no-fly zone and how we conduct operations in the future. >> can you give us your assessment as of now of the libyan air forces? how many fixed wing and helicopters have you destroyed and will you try to destroy as much capability as possible before you get to the point where you can get the no-fly zone where you want it? >> well, when we began this, my estimation is that his air force is not generally in good repair compared to what you would consider most world standards for air forces. he had a lot of equipment that was old, much of it was sitting parked in the runways and it could not be used. he was effectively employing a tactical air force, a helicopter air force i would say on the order of several dozen rather than large numbers. when we began the coalition strikes, on
. meanwhile, the u.s. now says it has moved igts ships and aircraft away from one of the quake-stricken plants after discovering low-level radioactive contamination and "the new york times" reports that the "uss ronald reagan" passed through a radioactive cloud, causing crew members to receive a month's worth of radiation in about an hour. this is something we had a gut feeling about on friday morning as the story was unfolding and now it appears to be escalating. >> the first reports out that were none of the nuclear plants were affected. mika refused to read the script that way. you just sort of knew. if you had an 8.9 or 9.0 earthquake, these facilities could be impacted. that's the real story now. we have our newspaper segment. you look at all of the headlines here, whether it's the boston globe, if you look, this is what "the washington post" is talking about. again, japan across the top. the "usa today," they're talking about an anxious wait and it is an absolutely anxious wait. "the wall street journal," mika, when we talk about the nuclear situation, "the wall street journal" has it ri
people. the chief spokesman for the government went on television saying, we might need help of u.s. military fighting the nuclear accident. already, 750 of the nuclear plant workers had been told to leave, to find a safe place. only about 50 had remained. and now, it's believed, even they had been told to stop for a time. japanese officials had begun using helicopters to dump water on one of the reactors. now, even that idea is deemed unlikely to work. pictures this morning show the helicopters trying. they had to stop. it's believed the last 50 workers were already the final line of defense, working frantic in an all-out race. and nuclear experts tell us they're likely using full body suits with air packs, rotating in and out on strict schedules trying to minimize their exposure. radiation sickness can begin to set in rapidly at levels of 1,000 millisieverts. that's the equivalent of 25,000 chest x-rays. if exposed, the symptoms are immediate. from vomiting to a steep decline in white blood cells wiping out their immune system. right now, the radiation levels
for the government went on television saying, we might need help of u.s. military fighting the nuclear accident. already, 750 of the nuclear plant workers had been told to leave, to find a safe place. only about 50 had remained. and now, it's believed, even they had been told to stop for a time. japanese officials had begun using helicopters to drop water on one of the reactors. now, even that idea is deemed unlikely to work. pictures this morning show the helicopters trying. they had to stop. it's believed the last 50 workers were already the final line of defense, working frantic in an all-out race. and nuclear experts tell us they're likely using full body suits with air packs, rotating in and out. radiation sickness can begin to set in rapidly at levels of 1,000 millisieverts. that's the equivalent of 25,000 chest x-rays. if exposed, the symptoms are immediate. right now, the radiation levels have retreated slightly to ten millisievert. equivalent of one c.t. scan for every hour of exposure. overnight, reactor number 4 caught on fire for a second time in 24 hours. one reactor exploded after
and their tiny westborough baptist church picketed at the funeral of u.s. marine matthew snyder, killed in iraq in 2006. snyder's father sued. >> i think it's an insult to every veteran out there that has served this country. >> reporter: the supreme court ruled the phelps are protected by the first amendment right to free speech. chief justice roberts wrote for the majority. "westboro may have chosen the picket location to increase publicity for its views and its speech may have been particularly hurtful to snyder. that does not mean that a speech should be afforded less than full first amendment protection." eight of nine justices agreed. >> liberals and conservatives have united in this on the side of free speech. >> reporter: justice samuel alito said the phelps inflicted pain on the family. "our commitment to free debate is not a license for mall ever lent attack on matthew and his family at a time of the church's well-centeredistrate see it which is central to the campaign." i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> here's your first look at some the other news going on around ameri
of change. that is very troubling. i think there are a lot of smart, smart people in the u.s. who could solve the financial problems. i think it is a travesty that none have been elected in congress. as a result, the people you put in congress spent $14 trillion we do not have as a nation. as a result, every single tax dollar that your audience sense of the u.s. government, 40% of that, 40 cents out of every tax dollar, is going to pay for interest. i think your programming of to be targeted on helping people understand -- got to be targeted on helping people understand what a difficult problem the nation is in because of the debt. and they need to take bold action. groveling over 6 billion, $10 billion is just a ridiculous conversation at this point in time. i think we need to tackle the big issues and i think you as the media need to help people understand and discuss it. that is my comment. host: thank you for the call. the 5% benchmark one of the earlier view was put on the table. from our twitter page, another of you were saying -- viewer saying -- gary locke, expected to be new am
confidence. they say u.s. power plants are safe. that may not be enough to ease public concerns. new polling last week found a sharp decline in the percentage of americans who support building new nuclear plants. so far, that fear has not spread to capitol hill. lawmakers are certainly raising concerns but nuclear energy still has bipartisan support. >> i'm not persuaded that nuclear power should be deleted from the list of options that we look at. >> i wouldn't, if i were the president, sign an executive order to freeze all construction of nuclear plants as the president froze all drilling in the gulf coast after that disaster down there. >> reporter: right now there are 104 nuclear reactors across the united states. these facilities account for just 20% of the nation's electricity. far less than countries like japan and france. nuclear power there makes up 70% of the total electrical output. and developing nations such as schin that and india are moving quickly to catch up. the chinese are currently building 100 reactors. last year president obama said the u.s. cannot afford to fall behind
. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more than 200 people including 189 americans died in the lockerbie bombing reports that moammar gadhafi may have ordered the attack, sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. receive any bernstein's husband was on the flight. >> we have chosen to look the other way because of business interests, because for some reason we thought we could bring gadhafi into the family of civilized nations. we now know how wrong
government forces and refbls on several fronts this morning. meanwhile, two u.s. warships entered the suez canal today, moving closer to the libyan coast. 400 marines are on board to help evacuate civilians, or provide humanitarian relief. cbs news correspondent mandy clark is with us with the very latest this morning. andy, good morning. >> good morning. i'm on the road to el breg which is a strategic town in eastern libya and also where pro-gadhafi forces are battling rebels in this oil stricken area. we're hearing that the rebels are managing to hold back the pro-gadhafi forces. we speak to one eyewitness on the phone, who described hearing jets overhead, and rockets going off. there's also a plume of smoke, which he says was part of an aerial bombardment. but it's unclear what was hit. now, we're currently in adjibaday and locals here say there's been an aerial campaign as well. they're saying a weapons depot has been hit but we can't independently verify that at the minute. >> mandy, el breg, you said you're on your way there. why is that area so important? >> well, el breg is particu
. this is the jam packed a border with tiny shop. help is being sent including supplies from the u.s.. it now appears that the libyan leader is doing a good job of hanging onto his job. today secretary of state henry clinton talked about the high stakes. >> in the years ahead, libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face a protracted civil war or could descend into chaos. the stakes are high. >>pam: libyan leader seemed to be winning back some trouble areas. your looking at a food convoy being sent out today. the government invited reporters to document this. they're been demonstrations in yemen thousands of anti-government protesters rallying in the capital. demanding that the president leaves office. there are also government loyalists, they are forcing their own protests and people on both sides have been killed in violent clashes. in new zealand funerals continue for the people killed in last week's quake. the death toll now stands at 159 and could go as high as to injured 40. this is one of the young people killed. some people still missing are some chinese students. >>pam: 5
and frustration from muslim americans before some capitol hill hearings this week. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >>> you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >>> the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to pound rebel forces. >> hospitals are now trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> all i saw is bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns. they were telling us it was too dangerous to proceed.
intelligence-gatherering. this is the first step to where the u.s. could be doing covertly arming the rebels in their fight against gadhafi. now, u.s. officials caution that they have not done that yet. this is essentially laying the legal groundwork to do that. once you do, it comes under fairly strict congressional oversight, but done in a classified way, carl. >> chuck, what has the white house said about this? what are they legally able to say if they want to deny it? >> reporter: it's a covert operation and is legally deniable. that's number one. the white house is not confirming anything. obviously a few weeks ago when this crisis began they did announce that the full capabilities of the u.s. intelligence community would be used. now, at the time the implication was this was about the over the air surveillance, things like that in order to try to track gadhafi's movements. it was also at that time that the cia operatives were going into the country to begin gathering intelligence about the operation and gadhafi. one other thing, carl, the u.s. intelligence community is very optimistic
. >>> well, 40 minutes past the hour now on this "american morning." check this out, u.s. military creating hummingbird-shaped drones. could they actually change the way the u.s. fights wars? >> well, it say prototype, not ready to go just yet, but certainly, fascinating. chris lawrence is in l.a. with more. i just love that preview of seeing that hummingbird fly all around you. how are they makes this work? >> kiran, t.j., this thing is pretty amazing. it moves like an actual living thing and it weighs less, less than a aa battery. imagine this thing perched on a telephone wire, and you can really start to imagine how difficult it would be to even know it was watching you. imagine a drone as small as a hummingbird, same shape, same sound. wait -- don't imagine. it's here. in this california lab. >> it looks more or less like an indigenous small bird and can fly through small clearings and trees. >> reporter: he says this is how the bird sees us from above. right now, the hummingbird can only fly a little longer than ten minutes. but at that size, imagine what it could do in ten hours. the
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
floated by officials to make us screen all letters that are being sent by the u.s. postal service. something like that would drive up the cost of security immensely so that's a way that you can really mess with the system even without executing a successful attack. >> david ross, thanks so much for your insightful analysis. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> i hope you're wrong. meanwhile, gretchen, steve, what do you got? >> thank you very much for asking. >> the orca that killed a trainer is back in action. he was greeted with wild applause. is this really a bad idea? a man who trained those animals says that animal could kill again and will. he'll join us. >> president obama wants us to all go green. take a look at what happened in one state when they tried to do it. yes, those are 3 x 5 foot solar panels on the street. the story coming up next. [ male announcer ] at e-trade, investing means taking action with professional-grade research. and some of the most powerful, yet easy to use trading tools on the planet. it's investing with intelligence and cold hard conviction. e-trad
. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >> and you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >> absolutely. >> really is. >>> before that, the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to found rebel forces. >> hospitals in the rebel-controlled cities are trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns ras lanuf and bin jawad. abc news was able to make it as far as brega before being turned around
to scale back u.s. military involvement in libya. >>> and tiger woods tees off in the arnold palmer invitational this afternoon. it has been a year since woods won a pro golf tournament. >> you know he's saying, please, let me win something. >> hope his putter works. >> oh, boy. okay. >>> finally, as you know, we do love animal stories around here. so, we could not pass up the chance to tell you about a cat in england named smokey. smokey the cat. >> name smokey the cat. reminds me of the movie "friday." they say when a cat is happy he purrs. smokey must be the happiest cat in the world. nick watt has the story. >> reporter: smokey seems pretty normal. fury, friendly, but that's because the volume's down. crank it -- unreal. and almost constant. is smokey the loudest cat in the world? 92 decibels. most cats peak at 20. but what does 92 decibels mean? well, it's louder than a washing machine. that's 70. about the same of a truck engine idling across the street and just a fraction less than what you would hear from a jet engine as a plane comes in to land. who's a nois
with that amount of money. we have this to report. general david petraeus, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan is apologizing for a nato air strike that killed 9 afghan children yesterday. in a statement petraeus said we are deeply sorry for this tragedy and apologized to members of the afghan government, the people of afghanistan and most importantly, the surviving family members of those killed by our actions. these deaths should have never happened. i will personally apologize to president karzai. military officials attributed the error to faulty communication as an air weapons team responded to an attack on a nato base. however, the strike is likely to increase already high tensions between karzai and nato commanders who came under scrutiny last month because of another case in which dozens of civilians were allegedly killed. >> we're putting our sons and daughters in an unwinnable situation. this as a parent of young children, this is an unspeakable tragedy. you also, though, look at the americans that are looking up from above, in a country they don't know, trying to figure out whether t
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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